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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

COMPARATIVE STRUCTURES


COMPARATIVE STRUCTURES
Complete the following sentences using an appropriate comparative structure.
1. The baby doesn’t look much ……………….. you.
a) as
b) like
2. Her eyes are not at all the same color ………………. yours.
a) like
b) as
3. I earn as much money ……………….. you.
a) as
b) like
4. It was ………………….. than I thought.
a) expensive
b) more expensive
c) most expensive
5. The car is running ………………… since it had a service.
a) faster
b) more fast
6. You are ……………….. annoying person in the whole neighborhood.
a) most
b) the most
c) the more
7. She is ………………….. than her sister.
a) less pretty
b) less prettier
8. I have got ……………….. than I used to have.
a) less energy
b) least energy
c) the less energy
9. I want to spend ……………………. working.
a) the less possible time
b) the least possible time
c) the lesser possible time
Answers
1. The baby doesn’t look much like you.
2. Her eyes are not at all the same color as yours.
3. I earn as much money as you.
4. It was more expensive than I thought.
5. The car is running faster since it had a service.
6. You are the most annoying person in the whole neighborhood.
7. She is less pretty than her sister.
8. I have got less energy than I used to have.
9. I want to spend the least possible time working.


CAPITAL VS. CAPITOL

CAPITAL VS. CAPITOL

To avoid the confusion, let us trace their differences:
Capital has several meanings. As a noun, it may mean “a city that is the seat of the government for a country or a state.”
“Egypt is getting a new capital – courtesy of China”
CNN
“Mozambique Renamo Opposition Official Shot Dead in Capital”
Bloomberg
“Afghan Officials: Taliban Enter Capital of Helmand Province”
ABC News
In finance, capital refers to “money, equipment, or property that is used in a business.”
“Why Theranos Should Return Its Capital To Investors”
Forbes
“Digital Health Entrepreneurs Raising More Capital Than Ever (Probably)”
Forbes
“Risky banks face higher capital needs from latest Basel reforms”
Financial Times
As an adjective, capital may denote “an upper case letter.”
“Power of capital letter at the eye of brewing political storm in KS”
KWCH
“Rush Limbaugh: Clinton Came Off As “A Witch With A Capital B” During Debate”
Media Matters for America
Capital may also mean “main or principal” as an adjective.
“Housing associations awarded funding for capital projects in Glasgow”
Scottish Housing News
“Lake Forest and Lake Bluff schools budget for capital projects”
Chicago Tribune
Meanwhile, capitol may be used to refer to “a building or set of buildings in which a state legislature meets.”
“Fort Worth man broke into Texas Capitol, damaged governor’s portrait, officials say”
Dallas News
“Event at Capitol focuses on domestic violence”
The Capital Journal
“Veterans visit the nation’s capitol with South Willamette Valley Honor Flight”
KVAL
Capitol may also be used to refer, more specifically, to the U.S. Capitol building located in Washington, D.C. However, it is imperative to use the capital letter “C” when referring to this particular building.
“Texas congressman saves unconscious man’s life at U.S. Capitol”
Dallas News
“The scaffolding on the U.S. Capitol is officially gone”
The Washington Post
“Police: All Clear After Probe of Suspicious Vehicle Near US Capitol”
Voice of America
It may be useful to remember that you may only use capitol if you are dealing with government buildings. Can you now identify when to use capital or capitol?


SIMPLE, COMPOUND OR COMPLEX


SIMPLE, COMPOUND OR COMPLEX

1. That irritating man is fortunate to have such a patient wife.
2. He held her close and swore never to forsake her.
3. This was a fashionable restaurant in former days.
4. It takes lot of fortitude to sail around the world alone.
5. In spite of being very intelligent, Mohit does not score good marks.
6. All the passengers were impatient to know when the train would arrive.
7. Father was late because he was held up at office.
8. It was a fortunate day when we opened that store.
9. Although the children were tired, they continued playing.
10. All of us liked the dress that she was wearing.
Answers
1. That irritating man is fortunate to have such a patient wife. (Simple sentence)
2. He held her close and swore never to forsake her. (Compound sentence)
3. This was a fashionable restaurant in former days. (Simple sentence)
4. It takes lot of fortitude to sail around the world alone. (Simple sentence)
5. In spite of being very intelligent, Mohit does not score good marks. (Simple sentence)
6. All the passengers were impatient to know when the train would arrive. (Complex sentence)
7. Father was late because he was held up at office. (Complex sentence)
8. It was a fortunate day when we opened that store. (Complex sentence)
9. Although the children were tired, they continued playing. (Complex sentence)
10. All of us liked the dress that she was wearing. (Complex sentence)



SO AND SO THAT


SO AND SO THAT

1. It was getting late, ………………… we decided to go home.
a) so
b) so that
c) Either could be used here
2. The last bus had gone, ………………. we had to walk.
a) so
b) so that
c) Either could be used here
3. The watch was very expensive, …………………… I didn’t buy it.
a) so
b) so that
c) Either could be used here
4. The teacher spoke slowly …………………. the students could write down everything.
a) so
b) so that
c) Either could be used here
5. We sent the parcel a few days ago …………………… they should have received it by now.
a) so
b) so that
c) Either could be used here
6. I was tired ………………………. I took some rest.
a) so
b) so that
c) Either could be used here
7. The dialogues were ………………….., I couldn’t help laughing.
a) so funny
b) so funny that
c) Either could be used here
8. The sky was dark ……………… I took an umbrella with me.
a) so
b) so that
c) Either could be used here
Answers
1. It was getting late, so we decided to go home.
2. The last bus had gone, so we had to walk.
3. The watch was very expensive, so I didn’t buy it.
4. The teacher spoke slowly so / so that the students could write down everything.
5. We sent the parcel a few days ago so they should have received it by now.
6. I was tired so I took some rest.
7. The dialogues were so funny / so funny that I couldn’t help laughing.
8. The sky was dark so I took an umbrella with me.


CITE VS. SITE VS. SIGHT


CITE VS. SITE VS. SIGHT
As with other homonyms, the terms citesite, and sight have identical pronounciations but have distinct meanings and uses. This post will help you clarify the differences of these words so you could easily determine when to use one over the other.
The term cite is used as a verb meaning “to quote or refer to something, to summon to bring in front of a court, or to issue a notice of violation.”
“Police Cite Self-Defense as Sergeant Fatally Shoots Bronx Woman, 66”
New York Times
“States Dispute ‘Rigged Election’ Claims, Cite Focus on Security”
Bloomberg
“Pentagon investigators cite Ash Carter’s former military aide for nightclub visits, ‘improper’ interactions with women”
Washington Post
Meanwhile, the term site is generally used as a noun denoting “an area of ground on which a town, building, or monument is constructed or a website.”
“‘Trump Place’ polling site irks New York City voters”
The Guardian
“Amazon drones are reportedly being tested at multiple UK sites”
Business Insider
“9 Helpful Sites For Finding Your Next Job In Tech”
Forbes
Site may also be used as a verb which means “to fix or build something in a particular place.”
“Seeking Informed Consent on Siting Nuclear Waste”
Energy Collective
“Wyckoff officials revisit siting of traffic light at Sicomac and Cedar Hill”
NorthJersey.com
On the other hand, the term sight is often used as a noun referring to “the faculty or power of seeing” or “a thing that one sees or that can be seen.”
“No End in Sight to Strike by Harvard’s Cafeteria Workers Over Wages”
New York Times
“Hiding in plain sight: The adult literacy crisis”
Washington Post
“World Sight Day: Over 200 screened for eye problems”
The New Times
However, sight may also be utilized as a verb  which means “to manage to see or observe someone or something” or “catch an initial glimpse of.”
“Black-capped kingfisher sighted at Keoladeo park in Jaipur”
Times of India
“Crocodile sighted in Palani river”
Business Standard
“Police seal off city centre as ‘armed’ man sighted in Chichester”
Chichester Observer


COMPLEMENT VS. COMPLIMENT


COMPLEMENT VS. COMPLIMENT
Words having similar spelling cause confusion  but having identical pronunciation makes things more difficult. This is the case with the terms complement and compliment.
When used as a noun, the term complement denotes “a thing that completes or brings to perfection” or “a number or quantity of something required to make a group complete.”
“Philip’s wireless light is a perfect complement to the company’s popular Hue bulbs”
Business Insider
“The Best Complement? Completing Each Other”
Chabad.org
“It’s Not a Complement”
America Magazine
Complement as a verb means “to add to something in a way that enhances or improves it or makes it perfect.”
“What Does It Take For A COO to Complement an Entrepreneur”
Entrepreneur.com
“Talented juniors complement seniors”
NorthJersey
“Fiscal policy needs to complement monetary steps-ECB’s Nowotny”
Reuters
Meanwhile, compliment, when used as a noun, refers to  “a polite expression of praise or admiration.”
“When Does A Compliment Become Sexual Harassment?”
Huffington Post UK
“Knicks’ Carmelo Anthony gives Jeremy Lin backhand compliment, says he is ‘excited’ for Nets point guard”
New York Daily News
“Asking for Money? Compliment the Donor, Not Your Organization”
New York Times
Compliment may also be used as a verb meaning “to politely congratulate or praise someone for something.”
“What happened when Trump and Clinton were forced to compliment each other”
Washington Post
“Student racially abused after complimenting woman on her dog”
Metro
“Tap This: Good meals compliment good beers”
The Weekender
Another source of confusion is their adjective forms complementary and complimentary. The adjective complementarymeans “combining in such a way as to enhance or emphasize the qualities of each other or another.”
“After cancer treatment, complementary care calms”
USA TODAY
“Steel giants hit by losses see hope in complementary businesses”
China Daily
“Complementary and Alternative Medicine: What Works?”
MD Magazine
On the other hand, complimentary refers to “expressing a compliment; praising or approving” or “given or supplied free of charge.”
“Morning Sports Update: Bills aren’t overly complimentary of Rob Gronkowski”
Boston Daily
“British Airways offers complimentary one-way first class upgrade”
Business Traveller
“Metquarter is offering complimentary cut throat shaves”
Liverpool Echo
There is a simple trick to remembering the difference of these two terms: If you are talking about completeness, then you must use complement, but if you are referring to giving praise or approval, you must select compliment.


WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE


William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon, England on April 23, 1564. He most likely attended King Edward VI Grammar School in Stratford, where he learned Latin grammar and literature. In 1582, he married 26 year-old Anne Hathaway at the age of 18. In 1583, William’s first child, Susanna was born. In 1585, he had twins, Hamlet and Judith. Between 1589 and 1590, William is believed to have written his first play, Henry VIII (part I). The next year, he completed the second part of the play.
By 1592, William had begun a career as a playwright in London. Two years later, he was an actor and part-owner of a playwright company, Lord Chamberlain’s Men. The company was successful and was adopted by King James I. It was then renamed The King’s Men. By this time, William was well-known throughout the London theater world. In 1594, historians believe he wrote The Taming of the Shrew, a famous comedy in which a character named Petruchio wins a bet for having the most “obedient” wife. The next year, in 1595, William wrote some of his most famous stories including A Midsummer’s Night Dream and Romeo and Juliet. A Midsummer’s Night Dream is a romantic comedy about four lovers and a group of amateur actors, and their interaction with fairies who live in a moonlit forest. Historians believe it was written for a royal wedding. Romeo and Juliet is arguably the most famous love story and tragedy of all time. In 1596, William wrote The Merchant of Venice, a famous comedy in which a Jewish merchant demands “a pound of flesh” when the lead character, Antonio, defaults on a loan.
After writing Julius Caesar in 1599, Shakespeare is thought to have written Hamlet, historically thought of as his greatest masterpiece. To this day Hamlet is probably his most quoted and reproduced tragedy. It is also Shakespeare’s longest play. The plot of the story involves Prince Hamlet, and his attempts to seek revenge on his Uncle Claudius for poisoning his father, King of Denmark, and ascending to the throne. The play contains one of the most famous monologues of all-time:
To be or not to be, that is the question —
Whether ’tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,
And by opposing, end them. To die, to sleep —
No more; and by a sleep to say we end
The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks
That flesh is heir to — ’tis a consummation
Devoutly to be wish’d. To die, to sleep —
To sleep, perchance to dream. Ay, there’s the rub,
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,
When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,
Must give us pause. There’s the respect
That makes calamity of so long life,
For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,
Th’oppressor’s wrong, the proud man’s contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law’s delay,
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of th’unworthy takes,
When he himself might his quietus make
With a bare bodkin? who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovered country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will,
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?
Thus conscience does make cowards of us all,
And thus the native hue of resolution
Is sicklied o’er with the pale cast of thought,
And enterprises of great pitch[1] and moment
With this regard their currents turn awry,
And lose the name of action
After Hamlet, Shakespeare wrote several other timeless classics such as Macbeth, Othello, and The Tempest. Many of his plays were performed by his production company at royal courts and at prestigious theaters. Shakespeare died in 1616 at the age of 52.
Today, William Shakespeare is widely regarded as the greatest writer in the history of English language. He is considered one of the few playwrights to have succeeded in writing both comedies and tragedies. He is credited for revolutionizing theater. Before Shakespeare, plays and performances almost always depicted the main character choosing a life of virtue over the temptation of evil. In contrast, the works of Shakespeare were less centered on morality and more concerned with provoking raw emotion and exploring the very meaning of what it meant to be human. Although his plays were not published until after his death, they have now been translated into every major world language, and have been performed continuously in community theaters, high school auditoriums, and major performing venues. Hundreds of “Shakespeare Festivals” exist across the world.